Diabetes specialists will be discussing the disease and its ocular complications at the IMO

On 15 and 16 November, the IMO will be hosting theComprehensive Approach to Ocular Complications in Diabetic Patients course to discuss developments in the treatment and prevention of diabetes

To mark World Diabetes Day on 14 November, the Diabetic Retinopathy Unit of the Ocular Microsurgery Institute (IMO) is organising the Comprehensive Approach to Ocular Complications in Diabetic Patients course in collaboration with the Vall d’Hebron Research Institute (VHIR). The course, which will take place on 15 and 16 November, is aimed at endocrinologists, diabetes educators, family physicians, ophthalmologists and optometrists, and has the objective of bringing together the latest developments in the treatment and prevention of diabetes through lectures, round tables and workshops.

The course will include the participation of representatives from all medical and healthcare fields involved in the treatment of diabetic patients

Under the coordination of Dr José García-Arumí (a retina specialist at IMO and head of the Ophthalmology Department of Vall d’Hebron University Hospital in Barcelona), Dr Rafael Simó (head of the Endocrinology and Nutrition Department of Vall d’Hebron University Hospital) and Dr Cristina Hernández, also an endocrinologist at the same hospital, the course will be attended by representatives from the various medical and healthcare fields involved in the treatment of diabetic patients. The aim is to strengthen links between the professionals who attend to diabetic patients, as coordinated action between them is essential to detect the disease early, slow down its progress and minimise the risk of the development of associated complications, the most common of which is diabetic retinopathy.

Diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, cataracts and macular oedema are all conditions associated with diabetes

Diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, cataracts and macular oedema are all conditions associated with diabetes 30% of the diabetic population has some degree of diabetic retinopathy and the vision of 10% of patients is seriously compromised when this disease reaches its advanced stages, which not only affects health, but also quality of life. The high number of diabetic patients with the disease makes diabetic retinopathy the leading cause of severe vision loss in working age people in developed countries today. Other ocular conditions that can occur or be accelerated by diabetes include glaucoma, cataracts, macular oedema and other retinal vascular disorders, which occur in more than half of diabetic patients with 15 or more years of evolution of the disease.

It is estimated that by 2030 the number of diabetics will reach 552 million

If we take into account that 13% of the Spanish population has diabetes, already considered a pandemic due to its exponential growth (the number of diabetic patients worldwide stood at 366 million in 2011, and it is estimated to reach 552 million by 2030), the need to prevent the disease is clear. Since the amount of time that elapses after onset and the degree of control of diabetes are two key factors, prevention and early and comprehensive treatment are of vital importance, and this is what IMO course next week intends to address.

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