An increase in oxygen after vitrectomy surgery causes glaucoma

One of the problems caused by vitrectomy surgery is the onset of open-angle glaucoma, which can affect up to 10% of patients, not immediately after the procedure, but, on average, five years later

One of the problems caused by vitrectomy surgery is the onset of open-angle glaucoma, which can affect up to 10% of patients, not immediately after the procedure, but, on average, five years later. This fact was highlighted during the Trends in Surgical and Medical Retina Conference organised by the Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular in Barcelona. During his participation in the scientific meeting, one of the world’s leading experts in this area, Stanley Chang, director of the Ophthalmology Department of Columbia University, New York, explained to Diario Médico that, according to the results of his team, the mechanism that triggers the onset of glaucoma after vitrectomy surgery is an increase in the oxygen level of the eye after surgery. Although this oxygenation usually occurs shortly after surgery, the pathological effects can take an average of five years to appear, which highlights the importance of long-term monitoring of these patients, explained Chang. Although a drug does exist, which is capable of regulating the eye’s oxygen level, it is not advisable to administer it to all patients after surgery. Download article as PDF

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